DIY Dual Extrusion

Dual extrusion 3D printers are not as uncommon as they used to be, but there are still a lot of single-extruder machines. [Paul Lang] wanted to refit his printer to take two MK8 extruders, and he documented his experience with a blog post that has a few good tips if you want to try it yourself.

[Paul] used Fusion 360 to design a holder for the extruders that would fit his printer. Since he had accidentally ordered a spool of pink PLA, the whole assembly is shocking pink — not subtle at all. He shares a few design tips about …read more http://pje.fyi/Pg4Jn2

Paul Jacob Evans

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3D Printing Flexible Surfaces out of Non-Flexible Material

Here’s some interesting work shared by [Ben Kromhout] and [Lukas Lambrichts] on making flexible 3D prints, but not by using flexible filament. After seeing a project where a sheet of plywood was rendered pliable by cutting a pattern out of it – essentially turning the material into a giant kerf bend – they got interested in whether one could 3D print such a thing directly.

The original project used plywood and a laser cutter and went through many iterations before settling on a rectangular spiral pattern. The results were striking, but the details regarding why the chosen pattern was best …read more http://pje.fyi/PdDCw3

Paul Jacob Evans

3D Printed Gearbox Lifts An Anvil With Ease

How strong can you make a 3D-printed gearbox. Would you believe strong enough to lift an anvil? [Gear Down For What?] likes testing the limits of 3D printed gearboxes. Honestly, we’re amazed.

3D printing has revolutionized DIY fabrication. But one problem normally associated with 3D printed parts is they can be quite weak unless designed and printed carefully.

Using a whole roll of filament, minus a few grams, [Gear Down For What?] printed out a big planetary gear box with a ratio of 160:1 and added some ball bearings and using a drill as a crank. Setting it up on …read more http://pje.fyi/Pb7bRP

Paul Jacob Evans

Make A Bit Of Cloth With This 3D Printable Loom

When the hackspace where this is being written created their textile room, a member who had previously been known only for her other work unexpectedly revealed herself to be a weaver, and offered the loan of a table-top loom. When set up, it provided an introduction to the art of weaving for the members of all different interests and backgrounds, and many of them have been found laying down a few lines of weft. It’s a simple yet compelling piece of making which  captivates even people who might never have considered themselves interested in textiles.

If you are not lucky …read more http://pje.fyi/PZWnFL

Paul Jacob Evans

3D printed Math Grenade

Calculator hacks are fun and educational and an awesome way to show-off how 1337 your skills are. [Marcus Wu] is a maker who likes 3D printing and his Jumbo Curta Mechanical Calculator is a project from a different era. For those who are unfamiliar with the Curta, it is a mechanical calculator that was the brainchild of Curt Herzstark of Austria from the 1930s. The most interesting things about the design were the compactness and the complexity which baffled its first owners.

The contraption has setting sliders for input digits on the side of the main cylindrical body. A crank …read more http://pje.fyi/PWMztB

Paul Jacob Evans

Using 3D Printing To Speed Up Conventional Manufacturing

3D printers, is there anything they can’t do? Of course, and to many across the world, they’re little more than glorified keychain factories. Despite this, there’s yet another great application for 3D printers – they can be used to add speed and flexibility to traditional manufacturing operations.

A key feature of many manufacturing processes is the use of fixtures and jigs to hold parts during machining and assembly operations. These must be developed before manufacturing begins and must be custom made to suit the given application. Many manufacturers outsource the development of such fixturing, even in large operations – even …read more http://pje.fyi/PVt2hn

Paul Jacob Evans

The Almost Working, DIY Underwater Scooter Pistol Thing

A dive scooter, or a submersible ducted fan used by divers, is not a new invention. They’ve been around for years, used by everyone from the villain of the week on Miami Vice to professional divers. Now that high-capacity Lipos, 3D printers, and powerful brushless motors are cheap, it was only a matter of time before someone built a DIY dive scooter. [Peter Sripol] is the man, and he also built a dive scooter, underwater pistol thing.

[Peter]’s dive scooter is almost entirely 3D printed. That includes the ducted fans/thrusters. The electronics are what you would expect from a grab …read more http://pje.fyi/PRjd1l

Paul Jacob Evans