Stripping 3D Printed Gears for Science

While 3D printing is now well on its way to becoming “boring” in the same way that a table saw or lathe is, there was a time when the media and even some early adopters would have told you that the average desktop 3D printer was perhaps only a few decades behind the kind of replicator technology we saw on the Enterprise. But as the availability of these machines increased and more people got to see one up close, reality sunk in pretty quickly.

Many have dismissed the technology as little more than a novelty, and even within the 3D …read more http://pje.fyi/Pw85nx

Paul Jacob Evans

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3D Printed Gearbox Lifts An Anvil With Ease

How strong can you make a 3D-printed gearbox. Would you believe strong enough to lift an anvil? [Gear Down For What?] likes testing the limits of 3D printed gearboxes. Honestly, we’re amazed.

3D printing has revolutionized DIY fabrication. But one problem normally associated with 3D printed parts is they can be quite weak unless designed and printed carefully.

Using a whole roll of filament, minus a few grams, [Gear Down For What?] printed out a big planetary gear box with a ratio of 160:1 and added some ball bearings and using a drill as a crank. Setting it up on …read more http://pje.fyi/Pb7bRP

Paul Jacob Evans

Customize Your Ratios with a 3D-Printed Gearbox

Small DC motors are easy to find — you can harvest dozens from old printers and copiers. You might even get a few with decent gearboxes too. But will you get exactly the motor with exactly the gearing your project needs? Unlikely, but you can always just print a gearbox to get exactly what you need.

There’s nothing fancy about [fortzero]’s gearboxes. The motors are junk bin specials, and the gears are all simple spur gears 3D-printed from PLA. There are four gears in the train, each with a 2:1 reduction, giving a 16:1 overall ratio. The gears ride on …read more http://pje.fyi/NtwvvF

Paul Jacob Evans