Building an Arduino Smart IC Tester for $25

There’s no question that you can get a lot done with the classic multimeter; it’s arguably the single most capable tool on your bench. But the farther down the rabbit hole of hacking and reverse engineering you go, the more extravagant your testing and diagnostic gear tends to get. For some of us that’s just an annoying reality of the game. For others it’s an excuse to buy, and maybe even build, some highly specialized equipment. We’ll give you one guess as to which group we fall into here at Hackaday.

[Akshay Baweja] is clearly a member of the second …read more http://pje.fyi/QGYzLc

Paul Jacob Evans

Advertisements

Getting Started with STM8

There are so many different CPUs today and often the hardest thing about using any of them is getting started and gathering the right software tools. If you’ve ever eyed up the very inexpensive STM8 processor, you’ll want to check out [Shane Burrell’s] video (see below) about how to get started with the STM8.

The STM8 isn’t a 32-bit processor — you could probably guess that from the name. [Shane] uses SDCC (small device C compiler) to target the little chip. He also shows how he manages a fairly substantial piece of code and how he controls the build process. …read more http://pje.fyi/QG6ZVD

Paul Jacob Evans

Count Your Fans with this Stylish ESP8266 Display

Continuous self-affirmation is a vital component to the modern lifestyle. Of course you know the world loves you, but exactly how much do they love you? Checking your phone every few minutes to see if you’ve gained any followers is gauche, and perhaps more to the point, doesn’t let you show off when you’ve got visitors over. In the modern era, the up-and-coming social media star needs a stylish way to display just how popular they are for the world to see.

That’s the idea behind this very slick social media counter created by [Becky Stern]. Built into a standard …read more http://pje.fyi/QFcvVD

Paul Jacob Evans

Hacking a Sonoff WiFi Switch

The ESP8266 platform has become so popular that it isn’t just being used in hobby and one-off projects anymore. Companies like Sonoff are basing entire home automation product lines around the inexpensive WiFi card. What this means for most of us is that there’s now an easily hackable and readily available product on the market that’s easily reprogrammed and used with tools that we’ve known about for years now, as [Dan] shows in his latest project.

[Dan] has an aquaponics setup in his home, and needs some automation to run the lights. Reaching for a Sonoff was an easy way …read more http://pje.fyi/QFLkGq

Paul Jacob Evans

ESP32, We Have Ways to Make You Talk

One of our favorite scenes from the [James Bond] franchise is the classic exchange between [Goldfinger] and [Bond]. [Connery] (the One True Bond) says, “You expect me to talk?” And the reply is, “No Mr. Bond, I expect you to die!” When it comes to the ESP32, though, apparently [XTronical] expects it to talk. He posted a library to simplify playing WAV files on the ESP32. There is also a video worth watching, below.

Actually, you might want to back up to his previous post where he connects a speaker via one of the digital to analog converters on the …read more http://pje.fyi/QFKW3L

Paul Jacob Evans

ESP32 Makes for World’s Worst Radio Station

We can say one thing for [bitluni]: the BOMs for his projects, like this ESP32 AM radio transmitter, are always on the low side. That’s because he leverages software to do jobs traditionally accomplished with hardware, always with instructive results.

In this case, the job at hand is creating an RF oscillator in the broadcast AM band and modulating some audio onto it. From his previous experience using an ESP32 to watch video on an oscilloscope, [bitluni] knew that the microcontroller’s DACs were up to the task of producing an 800-kHz signal, and he managed to produce a more-or-less sine …read more http://pje.fyi/QD4qr9

Paul Jacob Evans

DIY Graphene Putty Makes Super Sensitive Sensor

It is sort of an electronics rule 34 that if something occurs, someone needs to sense it. [Bblorgggg], for reasons that aren’t immediately obvious, needs to sense ants moving over trees. No kidding. How are you going to do that? His answer was to use graphene.

Actually, his super sensitive sensors mix graphene in Silly Putty, an unlikely combination that he tried after reading (on Hackaday, no less) about similar experiments at Trinity College resulting in Gputty. The Gputty was highly sensitive to pressure, and so it appears is his DIY version called Goophene. At Trinity they claimed to be …read more http://pje.fyi/QCTkJV

Paul Jacob Evans